The reasons why natural resources are curses to developing countries

The term resource curse was first used by Richard Auty in to describe how countries rich in mineral resources were unable to use that wealth to boost their economies and how, counter-intuitively, these countries had lower economic growth than countries without an abundance of natural resources. An influential study by Jeffrey Sachs and Andrew Warner found a strong correlation between natural resource abundance and poor economic growth. Common characteristics of these 29 countries include i extreme dependence on resource wealth for fiscal revenues, export sales, or both; ii low saving rates; iii poor growth performance; and iv highly volatile resource revenues.

The reasons why natural resources are curses to developing countries

They explain how to research, select, and finalize the perfect topic. There are an infinite number of good research paper topics. What separates good research paper topics from bad or merely adequate research paper topics is specificity and curiosity. By adding some specificity and curiosity, the topic becomes "why schizophrenia is more likely to occur in young men, and what causes it.

To add specificity and curiosity to any report topic requires asking a series of interested questions. For instance, if a student wanted to write a paper on the American Civil War for a history course, the general subject of interest is the American Civil War.

Now, the student must begin interrogating both himself and the subject to transform it into a good research paper topic. To begin, the student should ask, "What in particular interests me about the American Civil War"? The answer to this may be "the way it changed the social structure of the South.

The topic of this student's research paper will therefore be "how the American Civil War toppled the South's aristocratic-like social structure and thereby affected the traditions and beliefs of Southern culture at large.

Natural resources: The curse of developing countries?

It simply requires the student to think seriously about why certain topics are of interest—to both the student and to a wider audience.

Asking "why," "how," "because why," and "what" will eventually turn all topics into good research paper topics. There are many different topics and subtopics on which students may have to write a term paper, making it sometimes different for students to decide on just one topic for the document.

However, there are some strategies that students can use in order to refine their document topic selection. One of the first things that students can do when they are trying to decide what to write their documents on is to review their documents for their courses.

Chances are good that the student has been inspired or curious about a subtopic or general idea that has been presented in the course.

Resource curse - Wikipedia

Students may be able to take this topic or idea and write a term paper on it if they are able to develop the topic or idea well. Students may also be able to look at previously written reports on similar topics.

Many students turn to the Internet to find examples of reports on subjects that are related to their courses of study.

The reasons why natural resources are curses to developing countries

These term papers can help learners to refine their own ideas. Often, these reports from the Internet can also help learners to begin their documents, as they can sometimes serve as rough drafts.

Once a student has decided what to write a term paper on, the student needs to be committed to performing a suitable amount of research on that particular subject.

Expert Advice on Choosing & Formulating Good Topics

Researching just one subject takes time and may require the student to be creative about sources. Many professors may also assign report topics to students, especially if the student is having a difficult time trying to decide what to write a term paper on for a particular class.Oil, Population Growth, and the Resource Curse Tim Gu* Professor Robert F.

Conrad; Faculty Advisor, Duke University “resource curse” or the “curse of natural resources”.

Are natural resources a blessing or a curse for developing countries? The notion of the resource curse goes back to the 18th century, but the realities are more complex than the term might suggest. The resource curse is the theory that countries with an abundance of natural resources, such as oil and minerals, achieve less economic growth than countries that are not endowed with natural resources. The resource curse, also known as the paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources (such as fossil fuels and certain minerals), tend to have less economic growth, less democracy, and worse development outcomes than countries with fewer natural resources. There are many theories and much academic debate about the reasons for, and exceptions to, these .

This concept states that natural developing countries, only 8 of the 48 oil-producing countries used in this thesis’. The resource curse is the theory that countries with an abundance of natural resources, such as oil and minerals, achieve less economic growth than countries that are not endowed with natural resources.

Are natural resources a blessing or a curse for developing countries? The notion of the resource curse goes back to the 18th century, but the realities are more complex than the term might suggest. Why Natural Resources Are a Curse on Developing Countries and How to Fix It in those countries with the greatest natural resource endowments.

and gas resources within developing countries. resource curse, and that is one of the reasons why I have chosen it for a case study. Indonesia with its oil and gas resources was almost a perfect candidate for the curse in the ’s and ’s, and.

Aug 12,  · After all, taxing natural resources at high rates will not cause them to disappear, which means that countries whose major source of revenue is natural resources can use them to finance education.

Resource curse - Wikipedia